Balancing Confidence with Humility - The secret to Longevity

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Balancing Confidence with Humility - The secret to Longevity




Balancing Confidence with Humility

One characteristic that is often used to describe a great leader is “confidence.” People love to follow and work with a confident leader. However, as is true with many of our strengths, there are possible blind spots that can hinder a leader’s effectiveness. The blind spot often associated with confidence is arrogance.


Confidence is Not Enough

While confidence in a leader is attractive, it can sow seeds of distrust in followers if it is overdone. When a leader is too confident, followers have trouble relating. You may appear as lacking authenticity if you are so confident in yourself that you exclude from contributing.

Confidence is basically the quality or state of being certain or faith or belief that one will act in a right, proper, or effective way. being confident about something or in yourself is a good thing one will ever desire but then being confident alone is not enough, it must be coupled with humility.

Author and speaker Tim Elmore said, To be a great leader, you must be able to combine humility with your confidence. Humility signals self-awareness and authenticity. Confidence without humility breeds distrust; confidence with humility breeds credibility.

Dr. Elmore shares that your confidence makes your leadership believable, but humility makes your confidence believable. While confidence communicates energy and certainty, when you add humility, you communicate trustworthiness. 

When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom.
— Proverbs 11:2

This is what the Bible directly talks about Humility which is a driving force for the long-lasting of every system. in the absence of it comes to pride.

If leadership has a secret sauce, it may well be humility. A humble boss understands that there are things he doesn't know. He listens: not only to the other bigwigs in Davos but also to the kind of people who don't get invited, such as his customers.
The Economist, 26 Jan. 2013

This is worth thinking about!





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